Is Your Brand Confident?

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Just like people, brands need to be confident in order to succeed and leave a legacy behind. Just as how lack of self confidence leads to poor results in life which in turn fuel lower self esteem and confidence, brands that do not appear to be confident will lead to such a vicious circle.

What is brand confidence?

Brand confidence is the perception that a brand’s target audience would have about the state of affairs, the capabilities and ultimately the trust worthiness of that brand.

In other words, how your brand appears to your target market determines how much they trust you with their business and custom. This is not to be confused with “brand arrogance” that a lot of the super brands exhibit with their noise and market saturation. Brand confidence here refers to the subtle yet powerful nature of how quietly confident your brand is in itself.

How do you determine if your brand is confident enough?

Ask yourself these simple questions about your brand:

1) Is the brand active or reactive? – Does your brand react to situations and market conditions and then changes it’s behavior to be align with those situations or is it proactive and “goes to where the puck will be” – assessing situations and forecasting possible scenarios and then getting prepared for them before they happen?

2) Does the brand look professional and trustworthy? – Looking the part is one of the most fundamental yet grossly overlooked aspects of any brand. Does your brand look like a million dollars? Does it carry itself with an air of confidence and show that it cares about it’s image?

3) Is the brand consistent in it’s brand messaging? – Do your brand have a core message that is broadcasted consistently across all channels? Or does it only look like it is in business to make money and does not care about anything else?

4) Does your brand meet the minimum market needs and requirements – e.g., quality, reliability, price, delivery, support, features, etc. , and provide extra benefits for added satisfaction?

5) Do consumers convey positive emotional and cultural values and beliefs about your brand? – How are customer interactions – both good and bad? How are they handled? What is your brand’s attitude about unhappy customers? Where does the buck stop?

6) Does your brand possess a complete understanding of the brand promise you deliver to your customers? – Have you even identified your brand promise? Has that been articulated and then integrated into your messaging? Are your customers aware of this promise or are they making their own assumptions of what the promise is and in turn setting their expectations accordingly?

7) Does your brand understand existing or potential brand opportunities, and have you capitalized on them? – What mechanism does your brand have to proactively seek out, identify and then approach opportunities?

8) Can your brand objectives be summed up in a simple, yet informative, brand mission statement? – Having a comprehensive mission statement can not be stressed enough. What many may consider to be an expense or unnecessary overhead (time, effort and money spent in developing the mission statement) is in fact an investment in your brand – one that will mean the difference between a confident brand and one that is an amateur!

9) Does the brand recognize what the customer values most in other/alternative products with which your brand competes? – Having an awareness of the “emotional drive” that motivates customers to your competition is quite different from looking at your competition’s marketing campaigns, product or service offerings and their pricing structure. Emotional motivation knowledge is critical to success.

10) Does your company remain committed to investing adequately in organizational capabilities critical to delivering against our brand’s long term promise? – Investing in innovation and continual improvement is critical to the longevity of your brand and for assured long term success. Are you investing enough in the further?