Logo Design Basics

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Having a logo designed for your business can feel like a confusing and overly complicated issue. However, it doesn’t have to be this way. Going through the logo design process can be simple if you keep the following factors in mind.

What are you trying to say? When someone sees your logo, they should be able to identify exactly what you are trying to say. Whether this is information about your company or an appeal to emotion, your logo can say anything when it is designed by a professional who understands the language of graphic design. Your customers will feel drawn in by a logo that speaks to them and turned off by one that gives the wrong message. The simpler your message, the more successful it is likely to be, so try to condense all of your ideas into a few words. It is crucial that you know what you are trying to say before entering the next stages of the logo design process.

What colours, ideas, and themes relate best to my message? While your logo designer will definitely have ideas about this, no one understands your brand as well as you do. If a certain image or a particular colour truly speak to you, it is highly possible that your designer can make them part of your logo design.

A flexible logo is the most successful. This is sometimes the hardest thing for new business owners to understand about logo design. You spend a great deal of time choosing colours only to be reminded that the logo will often be seen in black and white, and therefore should be designed to maintain its power without colour. Similarly, the logo should also be scalable—that is, it should look equally attractive when blown up very large and shrunk down to a small size. This will allow you to use the logo design in the wide variety of situations that come up when managing a business in the UK.

Trust your designer. Business owners always have an idea of how their logo design should look, and this should absolutely be shared with your logo designer. However, your designer understands the basic principles of logo design and has the responsibility of making sure your logo ultimately works. Share your preferences, but be open to new ideas and allow your designer to follow their own instincts. You have nothing to lose from giving new ideas a chance, but a lot can be lost if your logo design isn’t as good as it possibly can be.

Live up to your promise. Your logo design ultimately will be making a promise to the consumer, of a certain type of product, service, and price range. If a customer feels that you do not live up to your promises, they will not be likely to return. If, on the other hand, their shopping experience is congruent with your brand, they will be likely to return and even to talk about your company to others. In London and the UK, word of mouth buzz is the best advertising available.