Cultivating a Multicultural Brand

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We hear a lot about multicultural brands and companies lately, but few people are specific about exactly what this means. What makes a brand ‘multicultural’? Can this be accomplished authentically, without being disingenuous or insincere? With the United States an increasingly diverse culture, understanding and cultivating diversity both in your company and in your customer base can pay off big.

One company that has made diversity a big part of their brand is Procter & Gamble. Here are a few ways that this home goods giant has accomplished this.

  1. Keep it simple when it comes to logo design. Procter & Gamble has very special needs when it comes to logo design. First, the design must be versatile enough to represent the many different products that the company manufacturers. Second, it must be broad enough to appeal to the customer base located over several countries and even continents. In this case, the simple blue P&G, while a little boring and generic, is actually just right for Procter & Gamble. Can your logo design appeal to people from a wide range of backgrounds? Talk to a logo designer if you are unsure.
  2. Avoid the melting pot mentality. There is no single campaign that is going to satisfy everyone, so don’t waste time looking. Having a multicultural brand will usually mean identifying your business’s core values and then marketing these values in a way that appeals to people of different backgrounds.
  3. Identify important groups. Because you can’t please everyone, it’s important to identify the cultures that you hope to reach. This will allow you to better target them. Once you know who your customer base is, you can begin tailoring a brand to appeal to them.
  4. Avoid clichés. The thing about clichés is that they are based on stereotypes rather than a diverse and varied group. No one ethnic or cultural group is homogeneous. This means that you will need to think about more than race, considering the needs and wants of the group you are trying to appeal to.
  5. Give diversity more than lip service. This will always come across as fake. Be sure to hire and promote from the ethnic groups that you are trying to reach. Not only will this make people from diverse communities feel more comfortable doing business with your company, it will give you a group of people to survey about how your branding, logo design, and marketing efforts affect your target audiences.

Creating a multicultural brand is more important than ever and will be more so in the future, considering that forty percent of Americans will be an ethnic minority in just a decade.  However, this should be considered not a threat, but a challenge. Your business will survive and thrive while others fail if you think outside the box and look for ways to reach out to a variety of cultures and ethnicities. Creating a multicultural brand is the first step in setting your business up for long term success.