Corporate vs Product Logo Design

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Heineken has changed a lot over the past years, although those of us on the customer end probably have not noticed. The company is now one of the largest beer companies in the world when you consider all 250 brands owned by the corporation. The problem, if you want to call it that, is that the Heineken conglomerate uses the same logo design as the Heineken beer, which can be confusing for people who then do not see the difference. However, this is changing as of this week, because Heineken introduced a new corporate logo design intended to represent its business in its entirety.

The new logo design is similar to the one used for Heineken beer in the UK, although there are subtle differences. The same cool green and hint of red are present. The Heineken name has been written in a similar font as used on the beer packaging, but in all capital letters to make it bolder. There is a red spark at the upper left side of the word, which the company says is meant to represent the “spirit and energy” of its employees, who currently number more than 70,000 worldwide.

The new drink logo design is a corporate logo, but what does that mean? Basically, it means that Heineken beers will maintain the same packaging and logo as they currently have, but that this will be used for the larger corporation alone. It will be on stationary, the company website and official documents, while your bottle of Heineken will look the same.

Like many beer brands in the UK, Heineken has gone through a long line of logos since its establishment in 1864.  However, unlike many modern corporate logos, we rather like this new design. It does not attempt to feel smaller and friendlier than it is by using a rounded lower case font, nor is it overly ambitious for the brand. In addition, it maintains certain recognizable aspects of the existing brand, such as the font and colour scheme, without being so similar it could be mistaken for the old logo. It has a definite corporate feeling, but is not stuffy or unapproachable. In other words, it is a branding win.

The Heineken name is powerful, especially in the UK where it is marketed as a high end beer with the taste of a small brand along with the consistent quality and availability of a large company. It has a similar image throughout the world. There is no need to mess with this winning image by changing the beer logo designs; simply adding a new corporate ‘umbrella’ logo is definitely sufficient.

While many people think that they can have a logo design created and then be done with the whole mess, branding is an issue that you will have to deal with as long as your company exists. As your company grows, you will need a new logo that fits its new structure. As your market changes, you will need a new logo that suits their needs. Branding and design are not one-time tasks, but rather a gradual evolution.