Coming to a Market Near You

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If you are one of the many people in the UK trying to cut gluten out of your diet (and eat out at one of our client’s gluten free bakery), then you will be happy to read this story. The Finnish brand Provena has redesigned their logo design in preparation for a move to international markets. The new packaging includes predominantly English language, which certainly suggests that the UK is among the proposed new markets.

Provena is owned by the Raisio Group and was originally intended for the Finnish market along. It makes breads, cereals and other grain products that are free of gluten, which is one of the fastest growing allergens in Western Europe and North America. Because a gluten sensitivity often means giving up grains altogether due to a lack of gluten-free products in this category, the brand grew quickly. It is now taking its first steps into other Scandinavian countries and may be coming to a Tesco near you.

The old logo was not bad at all. It was rather simple, in earthy tones that we generally associate with grains. The font is rounded and placed in lower case lettering which gives a friendly feeling. The V is replaced with a stalk of grain, which looks unfortunately like wheat. Wheat is the major grain that gluten-sensitive people cannot have.

The new logo design uses a generic oval that is angled to resemble a grain, but it is coloured blue. The writing is in lower case, rounded letters still, although these have been made thicker and even curvier. The grain that was once the V in the word is now placed in an image above the letter. It looks less specifically like wheat, which is a positive change for obvious reasons.

The new logo design is an interesting change, but it is more interesting considering that the packaging will now place the logo design in very small size, with the words ‘Gluten Free’ in large, black, scrolling script on a white background. Obviously this is the main selling point for these products. Because there is a lack of gluten-free grain products in many European markets, including the UK, this is a good decision for now. This packaging will probably be very successful in the UK once it is introduced here because allergen-free products are big business.

Provena is making the right decision in placing the main brand value proposition front and centre. In addition, rebranding with a new logo design and new packaging is essential when a company is moving into international markets. What works locally just may not work as well with a new consumer base. I rather liked the old logo design for this product, but the inclusion of a grain of wheat in the logo was not a good choice—even if the similarity was accidental. In addition, the new logo is cleaner and will stand out better on the grocery store shelf. The white boxes with bold black writing will make it very easy for gluten-sensitive customers to see why they should choose this cereal.