A New Logo Design Made in Britain

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People in the UK enjoy buying products made by our fellow countrymen, but it can be difficult to differentiate which items fall under this category. Even locally owned businesses often sell products that are sourced from other countries. With the UK economy in a low point, it is more important than ever to keep your hard earned money circulating in the British market.

A ‘Made in Britain’ logo design would provide a way for people to tell at a glance which items support their nation. However, there is no such design—until now, that is. A new ‘Made in Britain’ logo has been released by UK kitchen products brand Stoves.

The new logo design features the colours of the British Union Jack in a ribbon that is gently looped over to form the shape of wings. This is a positive design with a definite feeling of movement. It is positive and definitely relates to our country. If you examine the logo, the red stripes are smaller than the blue ones and separated by white negative space, which is a reflection of the ratio of colours seen on the British flag. This distinction will keep it from being confused with the many other national flags in similar colours. The ‘Made in Britain’ logo design is also eye-catching, which is important because it will likely be used in very small sizes on the packaging of UK products.

The writing is interesting—a somewhat traditional font that has been redrawn to have curved serifs and rounded diamonds to dot the I’s. This works well with the curve in the image and will also help the logo to be more easily recognized.

Stoves has noted that many of their customers are confused about where the products are from. This design was intended to clear up the confusion, and we believe it will perform this task.

The design was created in a logo design contest sponsored by Stoves and selected from a huge number of entries. The winner was Nottingham University’s Cynthia Lee. This is quite an accomplishment for the young designer’s CV. Stoves has stated that the store plans to allow other British manufacturers to use the design as well, so it can become a nation-wide symbol that a product has British origins. The initiative has won support from several UK manufacturers and also members of Parliament.

We are usually not fond of logo design contests; they are the best way to get a low quality or even plagiarised image that is useless as a branding tool. However, this design contest was limited to design students and thus received better quality entries. Moreover, it makes sense to involve the public (or a sector of the public with professional design skills, at least) in the creation of a logo meant to used by the public. This design would not work well for a corporate logo, but it will function well as a tool for determining which products support UK companies.